students

Trump says outbreak ‘is under control’; 13 nuns die in Michigan convent; 1B students hit by school closures

President Donald Trump is considering executive action as congressional leaders and White House officials struggle to reach a deal on the next coronavirus relief package.

Trump, in an interview with Axios, defended his administration’s effort to beat back the U.S. outbreak that has shown little signs of easing. 

“They are dying, that’s true,” Trump said. “It is what it is. But that doesn’t mean we aren’t doing everything we can.”

As more schools across the country welcome students back to class this week, some are already temporarily reclosing because of COVID-19 concerns. In Indiana, one school is shutting down two days after an employee tested positive for the virus. In another Indiana school, a student tested positive after the first day back to school.

The United Nations estimates more than 1 billion students worldwide have been affected by school closures. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the pandemic has created the largest

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1 billion students impacted by school closures; Census to end 2020 counting operations early; Hawaii cases surge

President Donald Trump is considering executive action as congressional leaders and White House officials struggle to reach a deal on the next coronavirus relief package.

As more schools across the country welcome students back to class this week, some are already temporarily reclosing because of COVID-19 concerns. In Indiana, one school is shutting down two days after an employee tested positive for the virus. In another Indiana school, a student tested positive after the first day back to school.

The United Nations estimates more than one billion students worldwide have been affected by school closures. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the pandemic has created the largest disruption to education in history.

Here are some significant developments:

  • The Census Bureau will halt all counting efforts by Sept. 30, a month earlier than planned.

  • The NFL and the NFL Players Association set Thursday as deadline for players planning to opt out of the

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As Maryland public schools go online this fall, private and parochial schools ready to welcome students on campus

As Maryland’s public schools announced their decisions to keep their doors closed at least for the beginning of the school year, private schools have done just the reverse — arguing they have the ability to give families the in-person classes they want while keeping students safe.

Because of their small size, some experts say private and Catholic schools, are better able to make quick adjustments to their curriculum and often have more physical space to spread students out. But financial forces and teachers unions are also shaping public and private school decisions.

“The driver has been meeting the needs of our students,” said Donna Hargens, the superintendent of Catholic Schools in the Baltimore Archdiocese. “The interpersonal interaction is essential to the learning process and we know that some of our students struggled with remote learning especially those with learning needs.”

Public schools, meanwhile, often have to cope with tightly-packed classrooms

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Colleges could reopen if they test students every 2 days; Fauci ‘cautiously optimistic’ for vaccine this year

In its biggest coronavirus vaccine deal yet, the U.S. said Friday it will pay French pharmaceutical company Sanofi and Great Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline up to $2.1 billion to test and produce 100 million doses of an experimental coronavirus vaccine.

The deal is part of Operation Warp Speed, a White House-led initiative aimed at getting a vaccine to stop SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

On Capitol Hill, Dr. Anthony Fauci testified Friday before a special House panel. He told the committee that he’s “cautiously optimistic” that by late fall or early winter a vaccine now being tested would be deemed safe and effective.

Also in Washington, the extra $600 in federal unemployment aid that helped many Americans stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic is expiring as plans for additional stimulus stalled in a deadlocked Senate.

Here are some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has recorded more than 152,000 deaths

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Maryland colleges are planning for students to return to campus. But that could all change.

The incoming freshmen had barely taken their first tentative steps onto the campus of McDaniel College in Westminster when it became clear this would be no ordinary orientation.

Among the swag they received: face masks in McDaniel’s signature green. The setting: the Gill Center, normally home to the school’s Green Terror basketball team, where blue painter’s tape marked safe distances on the bleachers and hallways. The message: Welcome, and please stay 6 feet apart.

This wasn’t quite what Shakia McKinnon expected college would be like when as a student at Green Street Academy in Baltimore she plotted her next educational step.

But with the coronavirus looming overhead, students will find campus life upended: Much of class time will transfer from in-person to online. Many students will reside in single dormitory rooms rather than with roommates. And sports, concerts and other events have been canceled.

McKinnon is not deterred but rather

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Who decides when schools close if students, staff contract coronavirus or cases spike locally? Superintendents seek guidance from state

While the state’s plan to leave some school reopening details in the hands of individual districts allows for greater flexibility, it also could leave school administrators having to make tough decisions about how and when to close school buildings if students or staff contract the coronavirus or an individual community becomes immersed in an outbreak.

A number of districts say they want more guidance from the state on how to respond to confirmed infections or spikes in COVID-19 in the wider community. Districts plan to work with local health officials on contract tracing and say they’ll likely send home cohorts of students or close individual schools, but they have not developed benchmarks for those actions, or for opening things back up.

Gov. Ned Lamont Wednesday said the state would “have a strong recommendation that you close those schools” if the rate of positive coronavirus tests reached 10%, but stopped short

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As UConn plans for reopening in midst of coronavirus pandemic, students prepare for new college experience

As UConn prepares to reopen in the fall, students balance a desire to return to campus with realistic expectations of what campus life will allow for during COVID-19.

Damani Douglas, 19, from West Hartford, said he has not yet decided if he will live on campus, especially because all of his classes are online. He said he does value the sense of community being on campus provided in the past.

“That’s why I picked UConn,” said the junior. “At the same time, there’s a level of danger with having that number of people together on campus.”

When it comes to following new rules, Douglas said, “I feel like it’s going to have to be a peer-pressure type thing. We’re going to have to keep each other accountable. I think some of it will fall on professors, if they do have an in-person class, to make sure everyone in the room

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Students in Chesapeake’s specialized programs push district for online option

As Chesapeake Public Schools works to figure out what the fall will look like, some students said one provision in the city’s reopening plan effectively forced them to return to the classroom.

They started an online petition that garnered hundreds of signatures this week, met with principals, program coordinators and top district officials in zoom calls and made an appearance on the local NPR affiliate.

On Friday, the school district said it is adjusting the language shared on a return-to-school plan for high school students enrolled in programs like International Baccalaureate at Oscar Smith, Governor’s STEM Academy at Grassfield and the Science and Medicine Academy at Deep Creek.

At first, students and families were told they’d need to choose the in-person option to remain enrolled.

But in interviews, the district says those students will be allowed to remain in their academies without losing a spot if they choose to learn

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ICE bans international students from entering U.S. for online classes

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced on Friday that international students who plan to solely enroll in online classes this fall will be barred from entering the country. The announcement came as the U.S. topped 4 million coronavirus cases and as colleges and universities roll out plans to shift to online learning for the fall semester.

“Nonimmigrant students in new or initial status after March 9 will not be able to enter the U.S. to enroll in a U.S. school as a nonimmigrant student for the fall term to pursue a full course of study that is 100 percent online,” ICE said in its press release.

The department also mandated that designated school officials are not to provide new international students with an I-20 form that declares their legal student status. This guidance includes new international students who are outside of the U.S. and want to take online-only classes

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New foreign students can’t enter US if courses online

A week after revoking sweeping new restrictions on international students, federal immigration officials on Friday announced that new foreign students will be barred from entering the United States if they plan to take their classes entirely online this fall.

In a memo to college officials, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said new students who were not already enrolled as of March 9 will “likely not be able to obtain” visas if they intend to take courses entirely online. The announcement primarily affects new students hoping to enroll at universities that will provide classes entirely online as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

International students who are already in the U.S. or are returning from abroad and already have visas will still be allowed to take classes entirely online, according to the update, even if they begin instruction in-person but their schools move online in the face of a worsening outbreak.

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