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Neshaminy School District teachers team up to help breast cancer patients

FEASTERVILLE, Pennsylvania (WPVI) — A pair of teachers from Bucks County, Pennsylvania are not allowing the coronavirus to hinder their mission of helping victims of a different disease.

Nicole Pomponio and Kathleen Zampirri have built a special friendship because of what they have in common. They’re both teachers trying to navigate online learning for the Neshaminy School District and they both have had a family member suffer from breast cancer.

“In 2016, my mom was diagnosed with stage III breast cancer,” said Pomponio. “Kathleen’s grandmom had just had breast cancer when Kathleen was very young. She, unfortunately, did not beat the cancer. When she was diagnosed our whole world was flipped upside down.

They wanted to ease that feeling for others. Since it’s October, and Breast Cancer Awareness Month, they had t-shirts made, and then sold to raise money to make care packages, that will go directly to breast cancer

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Summit High School temporarily suspends in-person learning after 9 COVID quarantines

FRISCO — Summit School District is temporarily suspending in-person learning at Summit High School due to several groups being quarantined in recent days.

Students will return to online-only learning at the high school Tuesday, Oct. 27, as they make their way back from fall break. Officials intend to bring students and teachers back into the building beginning Nov. 9.

“It’s never easy to make these kinds of decisions, but the health and safety of our students and staff is most important to us,” said Mikki Grebetz, a spokesperson for the school district. “… We do recognize that this will be a hardship for families and disappointing for all those scholars who want to be in school learning. We also think that being in person and being together is good for their social and emotional health, and we hope to continue in-person instruction throughout the school year. But it will take

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New Landmark Study at UM School of Medicine Finds Aspirin Use Reduces Risk of Death in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients | News

BALTIMORE, Oct. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were taking a daily low-dose aspirin to protect against cardiovascular disease had a significantly lower risk of complications and death compared to those who were not taking aspirin, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). Aspirin takers were less likely to be placed in the intensive care unit (ICU) or hooked up to a mechanical ventilator, and they were more likely to survive the infection compared to hospitalized patients who were not taking aspirin, The study, published today in the journal Anesthesia and Analgesia, provides “cautious optimism,” the researchers say, for an inexpensive, accessible medication with a well-known safety profile that could help prevent severe complications.

“This is a critical finding that needs to be confirmed through a randomized clinical trial,” said study leader Jonathan Chow, MD,

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School districts face hard choices amid pandemic-era cuts

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Kristina Negron poses for a photograph Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, in Schenectady, N.Y. Negron was laid off from her job as an aide for a special education class at Schenectady High School due to budget cuts.

AP

The school year in this old industrial city started with a whack of a budget ax. Teachers, classroom aides and counselors were among the hundreds laid off with potential state aid cuts looming.

Pre-K is suspended, online classes are at maximum capacity and the ranks of paraprofessionals are decimated across the 9,935-student school system in Schenectady, New York, a city on the Mohawk River where old factory buildings and a giant stylized “GE” sign over the General Electric complex speak to its manufacturing heyday decades ago.

“We go from struggling to drowning,” said Jamaica Miles, a local social justice activist trying to make sure her fourth grader and 10th

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In Connecticut, high school football was canceled. A private league launched in its place.

They instead wore nondescript jerseys and kicked off under the new team names “Eastsiders” and “Westsiders” — representing their ends of town as part of the newly formed Connecticut Independent High School Football League, which was privately launched this month after the state’s high school athletic association canceled the fall season because of the novel coronavirus pandemic.

“We kind of just said, ‘We’re going to find a way to make it happen,’” said Kevin Frederick, who coaches at Maloney and now one of Meriden’s independent teams in the league.

The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference’s decision was made in the wake of recommendations from Gov. Ned Lamont (D) and the state’s Department of Public Health to postpone football — which health experts say is among the most dangerous sports to participate in during a pandemic — until the spring.

Yet Lamont has left the ultimate decision to play football this fall

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‘Find a balance’: Mental health, social connections cited in debate over playing prep sports | High School Sports

Pertzborn, also active on social media advocating for students in athletics, has been frustrated how prep athletics decisions have unfolded in Dane County and the state this year.

“Anytime we get to a decision, the goalpost gets moved and we can’t get near it,” he said, imploring people to work together.

He said the situation has been difficult on everyone, particularly seniors. Middleton is scheduled to play football in the alternative fall season in the spring.

He said the students will need to make good choices if they want to play.

“I’m glad we are trying to move forward to see if it is doable (in a safe manner),” said Pertzborn, whose daughter, Sierra, is a sophomore volleyball, basketball and track and field athlete at Middleton. “We will give it our best effort. It will take discipline, sacrifice and commitment not only from the coaches but from the athletes.”

Sun

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Winter prep sports decisions evoke passionate responses | High School Sports

“To start the season, all instruction will be skill and drill work, not full practices. … During all activities, everyone must maintain 6 feet of social distancing and wear a fabric face covering. Based on these guidelines, we will be using a number of facilities in the district for practices.”



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Schlitz realized there will be many reactions to the Madison school district decision, saying that “it came down to the fundamental tenet of education-based athletics being an extension of the classroom and a vital component of the community and its connectivity.”

Among schools planning to continue to play, Portage athletic director Ed Carlson said his school formed some great partnerships with area schools this fall while competing and will look to build its winter schedules in a similar way.

“Although there will be lots of tweaks, changes and challenges along the way, our school district team is committed to

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Reading School District not ready to decide whether to bring students back to classrooms | Berks Regional News

READING, Pa. – The Reading School District administration on Wednesday said it is not yet ready to make a recommendation on whether students will be brought back to classrooms in the near future.

When the board voted for all-virtual learning in August, the administration recommended the online model continue for the first marking period, which ends Nov. 4.

The administration was supposed to make a recommendation at the October committee-of-the-whole meeting as to what the learning model would be beginning on Nov. 5.

Dr. Khalid N. Mumin, superintendent, explained the administration recently attended a virtual meeting with the State Department of Health and the Department of Education where officials defined Berks County as being in a substantial stage in regard to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Quite simply, there is a process that the Department of Health and the Department of Education is following,” Mumin said. “If the county is in a

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St. Charles high school students head back to school

ST. CHARLES – St. Charles East High School senior Bilal Karim admitted that it was kind of weird walking into a classroom on Tuesday.

St. Charles Dist. 303 high school students returned to the classroom on Tuesday as part of a hybrid of in-person and remote learning. St. Charles East and North high schools began the school year with remote learning.

“It’s very strange because it had been over 200 days since I was last sitting in a classroom as a student,” Karim said.

All students will do remote learning on Mondays followed by a blend of in-person and remote learning the rest of the week. Karim was a student representative on the District 303 Reopen School Task Force.

He was part of a committee that worked on building health and safety.

“We put so much effort into having students return that we went above and beyond to really make

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WS/FCS school board to consider delay of phased re-entry plan for students

WS/FCS school board to consider delay of phased re-entry plan for students


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DIAGNOSED WITH COVID-19 SURVIVES A STROKE AND A HEART ATTACK. HER MESSAGE TODAY AFTER SPENDING MONTHS IN THE HOSPITAL. KENNY: HAPPENING NOW, SOME GUILFORD COUNTY STUDENTS COULD RETURN TO CLASSROOMS NEXT WEEK. TALITHA: JUSTIN HAS THEIR MESSAGE, LIVE. >> I WILL TELL YOU, THERE WERE A LOT OF FOLKS OUT HERE TONIGHT, MANY WEARING RED AND HOLDING SIGNS. IT WAS PUT ON BY THE FORSYTH COUNTY OF EDUCATE — COUNTY EDUCATORS AND THEY SAY THEIR MAIN MESSAGE IS TO MAKE SURE THAT SCHOOLS OPEN UP SAFELY AND THEY DO NOT WANT TO SEE KIDS OR STAFF GETTING SICK. THE PRESIDENT OF THE FORSYTH COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATORS SAYS THEY HAVE SENT RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE SCHOOL BOARD THAT INCLUDE ADDING MORE STAFF TO SCHOOLS. >> WE NEED MORE

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