school

Trump says outbreak ‘is under control’; 13 nuns die in Michigan convent; 1B students hit by school closures

President Donald Trump is considering executive action as congressional leaders and White House officials struggle to reach a deal on the next coronavirus relief package.

Trump, in an interview with Axios, defended his administration’s effort to beat back the U.S. outbreak that has shown little signs of easing. 

“They are dying, that’s true,” Trump said. “It is what it is. But that doesn’t mean we aren’t doing everything we can.”

As more schools across the country welcome students back to class this week, some are already temporarily reclosing because of COVID-19 concerns. In Indiana, one school is shutting down two days after an employee tested positive for the virus. In another Indiana school, a student tested positive after the first day back to school.

The United Nations estimates more than 1 billion students worldwide have been affected by school closures. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the pandemic has created the largest

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Tennessee parents send kids back to school amid new COVID-19 cases

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Monday was back to school for students in Sumner County, Tennessee. 

But unlike in past years, parents are grappling with difficult decisions as to how to send their children back safely as the novel coronavirus pandemic continues, and what those decisions will mean for their families.

Even as the vast majority of school districts around the country prepare to reopen in some form over the next month, new cases of COVID-19 were reported at schools that resumed in-person instruction last week in Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi and elsewhere in Tennessee. 

Sumner has remained among the counties reporting the highest case counts in Tennessee during the pandemic. There were 3,178 confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases in the county as of Monday, the latest data available from the Tennessee Department of Health. Of those, 1,348 cases are active. There have been 1,760 recoveries and 70 deaths.

Levels of comfort range

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1 billion students impacted by school closures; Census to end 2020 counting operations early; Hawaii cases surge

President Donald Trump is considering executive action as congressional leaders and White House officials struggle to reach a deal on the next coronavirus relief package.

As more schools across the country welcome students back to class this week, some are already temporarily reclosing because of COVID-19 concerns. In Indiana, one school is shutting down two days after an employee tested positive for the virus. In another Indiana school, a student tested positive after the first day back to school.

The United Nations estimates more than one billion students worldwide have been affected by school closures. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the pandemic has created the largest disruption to education in history.

Here are some significant developments:

  • The Census Bureau will halt all counting efforts by Sept. 30, a month earlier than planned.

  • The NFL and the NFL Players Association set Thursday as deadline for players planning to opt out of the

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Check Out Fall Plans For NoVA School Districts

VIRGINIA — With about a month to go before school resumes in the fall, many school districts across the United States continue to grapple with how best to offer instruction amid the coronavirus pandemic. In Northern Virginia, the debate has ended, with all school districts in the region choosing to start the 2020-2021 school year with virtual instruction.

Many school districts considered a hybrid approach, where students could choose to spend two or three days a week at school and two days with remote instruction. Almost 43 percent of parents of children in the Fairfax County Public Schools system picked the hybrid option compared to nearly 41 percent who opted for 100-percent online learning. In Loudoun County, a majority of parents in Loudoun County selected the all-virtual option for their children.

As the coronavirus grew worse in southeastern Virginia and other parts of the country, school districts in Northern Virginia

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More pro athletes opt out, Indiana student tests positive on first day of school, Birx warns rural US

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion stimulus package Sunday, with checks to individuals, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Meanwhile, more pro athletes say they won’t play this season, and another music festival has

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More pro athletes opt out of season, Indiana student tests positive on first day of school, Birx warns rural US

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion stimulus package Sunday, with checks to individuals, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Meanwhile, more pro athletes say they won’t play this season, and another music festival has

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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North Penn To Begin School Year Fully Online

LANSDALE, PA — The North Penn School Board of Directors voted on Thursday evening to begin the school year fully online, with no in-person instruction through early November. They join Norristown and Upper Dublin as other Montgomery County school districts who have decided against bringing students back into physical classrooms to start the year.

The board unanimously passed the motion, 9-0. The board will consider a possible shift to a hybrid model, with students learning partially online and partially in-person, on Nov. 6, which is the end of the marking period for older students.

>>Coronavirus Spreading Among Youth Sports Teams In Montco

“As we learn more, we can adjust accordingly,” board member Jonathan Kassa said during the meeting.

Both the board and members of the school community who participated in the public meeting cited the numerous risks and the ongoing uncertainty of the pandemic and its course in the county.

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Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

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See Fall School Plans For Philly Area

PHILADELPHIA, PA — With just about a month to go before school resumes for the fall, districts throughout the region and country continue to grapple with how best to offer instruction amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Gov. Tom Wolf has determined that Pennsylvania public schools in the state’s yellow and green phases can resume in-person instruction in the fall, provided their district creates an approved safety plan. The safety plan, which must be approved by the school board, lays out how the districts will provide instruction, whether it’s through an in-person model, hybrid, or all virtual.

Earlier this month, state health and education officials issued updated guidance for schools as they prepare for the start of in-person learning during the coronavirus pandemic. The updated guidance clarifies that students must wear masks at all times during the school day, except when eating, drinking or situated six feet apart.

The state guidance also

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