Home

These Expert-Approved DIY Traps Will Actually Kill Ants in Your Home

Photo credit: Shayne Hill Xtreme Visuals - Getty Images
Photo credit: Shayne Hill Xtreme Visuals – Getty Images

From Prevention

It isn’t exactly ideal when you spot a line of ants traipsing through your place or hanging out on your kitchen counters. After all, you live there and, last you checked, you didn’t sign up for pests as roommates.

If you have kids or pets, though, it’s understandable that you might be wary of whipping out more conventional ant-killing methods, like pesticide-ladened sprays and bait traps.

So, what other methods can help kill them off? Below, pest experts explain why these tiny critters can be tough to eradicate, and the DIY ant traps that will actually get rid of them.

Why is it so hard to get rid of ants?

“Ants typically build large colonies, sometimes in hard to reach places,” explains board-certified entomologist Desiree Straubinger, market technical director for Western Exterminator. “It becomes a numbers game where even

Read More

These online courses help you become better at working from home

These online courses help you become better at working from home
These online courses help you become better at working from home

TL;DR: Prepare for any future transitions with the 2020 Work From Anywhere Hacker Bundle for $29.99, an 84% savings as of July 31.

As work and home life continue to meld, it can be difficult to maintain boundaries, stay productive, and keep your mental health in check — especially since the COVID-19 pandemic won’t seem to let up.

But here’s the thing. Successfully working from home really just takes a few essential skills: self-motivation, communication, collaboration, and time-management. Easier said than done, right? If you need a bit of a push in the right direction, this 2020 Work From Anywhere Hacker Bundle can help you ace the work from home lifestyle and develop the skills you need to thrive as a remote worker.

The course collection comes from Cudoo.com, a comprehensive and practical lifestyle e-learning platform with more than

Read More

20 Ways GH Editors are Staying Sane While Sheltering at Home

Photo credit: courtesy
Photo credit: courtesy

From Good Housekeeping

The Good Housekeeping staff usually spends hours together devising fun crafts and cooking projects, home decor ideas and cleaning hacks, beauty tips and the best products for, well, everything. We get such joy out of working as a team and then sharing the results with you, our readers. And over the past few months, we’ve kept on keeping on – just from our separate abodes and living situations. Throughout our time sheltering at home, we’ve all had to get creative to keep ourselves and our families safe and entertained and to find a moment of sanity wherever and however we can. That looks different for everyone, just like our circumstances do, but we realized all of our techniques have one thing in common: They might be useful for others, too.

As many of us face an uncertain summer, we thought you might like a

Read More

For HBCUs, the coronavirus pandemic hits especially close to home

Leaders of historically Black colleges and universities are grappling with a challenge others in higher education don’t fully share: how to reopen their campuses to a population that has proven especially vulnerable to Covid-19.

Black people are dying at 2.5 times the rate of white people, according to the Covid Racial Data Tracker. And nearly a third of deaths among nonwhite Americans were in people younger than 65, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared with 13 percent among white people under that age.

“We have to acknowledge and recognize that African Americans with comorbidities have fared far worse in this pandemic than any other group,” said Howard University President Wayne A.I. Frederick in an interview. “I think, for an HBCU in particular, there’s a lot of differences in terms of opening that are probably a little more accentuated because of our circumstances.”

Howard,

Read More

24 Money-Making Apps That Turn Sitting at Home Into a Side Hustle

Photo credit: katie buckleitner
Photo credit: katie buckleitner

From Cosmopolitan

Besides nailing a Tiktok dance, there’s no better feeling than watching your bank account level up (hey Ciara). Between scrolling through Instagram, adoring Nicki M’s maternity photos, and anticipating that text back for shooting your shot, why not make some extra cash?! Making money can literally be a no brainer if you have the right technology.

Maybe learning to invest is on your bucket list, or your closet’s calling (she needs some space), or you just want some free food. Whatever your situation, there’s an app to utilize your skill set with their unique, money-making platform. And that’s pretty freaking amazing since many of us could use A LOT more money right about now.

Check out these kinda genius apps for making money at home, but beware: Time flies when you’re making $$$ so keep your charger close.

1. If You Want to Start

Read More

Comic-Con 2020 Opens ‘At Home’ in Uncertain Times

To use the words of prophet and frequent convention attendee Hunter S. Thompson, when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. This year, the professional weirdness of Comic-Con has taken a twist, as the four-day event will take place exclusively online.

To their credit, organizers are trying to replicate the commercialized fan-friendly confines of the San Diego Convention Center as much as possible: there is the traditional souvenir book featuring a pretty sweet drawing of Ray Bradbury on a T. Rex on the cover that is available for free .pdf download (and featuring click-through advertisements!), and you can print your own badge (sponsored by Amazon Prime Video!) to wear as you sit in front of your screen at home. The Comic-Con homepage also will take you to an online Exhibit Hall, where there will be interactive exhibits and events offered by vendors.

There are literally hundreds of panels that … Read More

Why the new doctor’s office is your own home

What do you do when you can’t go to the doctor’s office? As the COVID-19 pandemic has forced people around the world to stay at home and avoid crowded and possibly contaminated areas, this has become a big concern.

The pandemic has spurred a new wave of innovation, shedding new light on online diagnosis and remote care technologies that have been around for a while but have been limited to the doctor’s office.

The Dutch startup community, one of the fastest-growing technology hubs in Europe, has played a key role in developing new tools and facilities to make sure doctors can monitor and care for patients remotely. Techleap.nl, a non-profit responsible for accelerating the Dutch startup ecosystem, has helped nurture and grow health-tech startups that are now providing remote care services in the Netherlands and beyond.

Here are just a few areas of medicine where startups are making doctor’s office

Read More

21 Things a Professional Organizer Would Never Have in Her Own Home

We’ve purged, consolidated and donated. But for some reason our closets, pantries and medicine cabinets runneth over with…stuff. In our quest to become the minimalist neat-freaks we know we can be, we asked New York City-based professional organizer Laura Cattano what exactly we’re doing wrong. With a “living better with less” philosophy, here’re the 21 things Cattano says we should nix from our homes.

RELATED: Nate Berkus’s 10-Minute Trick for Making Your Kitchen Prettier

Unless you’re using it for only one or two jackets—let’s face it: you’re not—they become overloaded. Coats, hats and bags become hard to find and it winds up looking like a jumbled mess. Hooks, on the other hand, are your friend.

Recycle the keys you have no hope of identifying and label the remaining ones with a sticker or nifty label maker.

Most people don’t have enough paper to fill an entire cabinet. Archival

Read More

Trump team relaxed training rules for nursing home staff just as pandemic hit

Shortly after the first coronavirus outbreak ravaged a nursing home in Kirkland, Wash., the Trump administration moved to fulfill a longstanding industry goal — waiving the requirement that nurse’s aides receive 75 hours of training and allowing people who study only eight hours online to become caregivers during the pandemic.

The industry had been fighting for years to reduce training requirements, saying they make it harder to recruit staff. The day after the administration announced the change, the industry rolled out a free online training program for certifying the new role — called a “temporary nurse aide” — that has since been adopted by at least 19 states.

Now, after more than 55,000 nursing home residents and workers across the country have died from the coronavirus, advocates for older adults and families of residents say they fear the change was premature, and contributed to the spread of the disease. Nurse’s

Read More

Cuomo takes heat over nursing home deaths; California tightens restrictions; New York sends testing teams to Atlanta

Much-needed pandemic help was on its way to Atlanta on Tuesday while Californians joined a lengthening list of Americans facing tighter restrictions in the face of the rapidly burgeoning coronavirus crisis.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday in a joint conference with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms that his state would send testing and contact tracing teams to the city.

“Mayor Bottoms, we’ve been watching you and what you’ve been going through,” Cuomo told Bottoms. “Anything we can do for you, for the city, we stand ready.”

But Cuomo, lauded globally for efforts that flattened the curve in New York, was taking heat back home for his administration’s report that appeared to off-load blame for thousands of deaths at nursing homes in the state.

In California, Los Angeles and San Diego public schools announced they will begin the school year online-only. And Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered fitness centers, churches,

Read More