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Here’s what you need to now about the flu and COVID-19 | Local News

COVID-19 infections are ticking up just as flu season begins, a worry for public health officials responding to the pandemic. Here’s what you need to know about the two respiratory illness.



Health officials brace for 'twin-demic' as COVID-19 resurgence, flu season converge

What are the symptoms for influenza and COVID-19?

The respiratory illnesses share many of the same symptoms including fever, body aches, sore throat and headache. In addition to these, COVID patients also may also experience conjunctivitis, skin rash or loss of smell and taste.

How are COVID-19 and influenza spread?

The viruses are transmitted by close contact — within 6 feet — through respiratory droplets when an infected person sneezes, coughs or speaks.

What is the major difference between the two diseases?

Individuals can spread these diseases before symptoms develop, but with COVID-19 the duration can be as long as 14 days. In some people, the coronavirus also appears to cause more serious illness.

How do you

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Here’s how doctors say to advocate for yourself at appointments

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It can be challenging to feel heard at the doctor’s office. Here are some tips to help you advocate for yourself.

Delaware News Journal

Shana Payne knows that when she selects a doctor, she needs to be extra careful. 

The Newark mom had for years been dealing with symptoms related to fibroids in her uterus, a common condition that affects many women – particularly African American women – in their childbearing years.

It wasn’t until Payne moved away from Delaware only to return as an adult that a female doctor even mentioned fibroids to her. It was indeed what had been plaguing Payne and for the first time, she was able to get the help and surgery she needed. 

“No one had ever told me anything about fibroids,” she said. “No one had told me that having heavy periods like that was abnormal.”

And it was all because her

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Obamacare Open Enrollment Starts Nov 1. Here’s What’s Changing This Year : Shots

Open enrollment is about to start for those buying private insurance off state or federal exchanges.

PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images/PhotoAlto


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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images/PhotoAlto

Open enrollment is about to start for those buying private insurance off state or federal exchanges.

PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images/PhotoAlto

Facing a pandemic, record unemployment and unknown future costs for COVID-19 treatments, health insurers selling Affordable Care Act plans to individuals reacted by lowering rates in some areas and, overall, issuing only modest premium increases for 2021.

“What’s been fascinating is that carriers in general are not projecting much impact from the pandemic for their 2021 premium rates,” said Sabrina Corlette, a research professor at the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Although final rates have yet to be analyzed in all states, those who study the market say the premium increases they have seen to date will be in

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U.S. pandemic response is chaotic. Here’s how to improve it.

Timothy R. Franson and Peter J. Pitts
Published 7:02 a.m. ET Oct. 18, 2020

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Indiana is staying in Stage 5 of its reopening, Gov. Eric Holcomb said, until at least mid-November. The state is facing more coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

Wochit

If a foreign nation invaded our shores, would the federal government insist defense responsibilities be organized by individual states? Would Washington quit the United Nations if we had differences of opinions about how to address similar aggression globally?

Not likely. Visible threats normally provoke and require united responses.

Now consider a stealthy, microscopic enemy, COVID-19, which has inflicted harm, death, despair and economic hardships on every state, city and municipality across our land.

Briggs: Holcomb’s new COVID strategy relies on good behavior over data

Indiana: State’s mask mandate extended again

Despite advance warnings, we were not prepared to take a holistic approach to this. We were not armed

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Should kids go trick-or-treating? Here’s how to make Halloween less scary

Halloween isn’t really supposed to be scary, but COVID-19 has made trick-or-treating frightening for many parents.

There are safe ways to celebrate, but health experts say people need to accept that some traditions need to be adapted to the world today.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a complete list of recommendations for the Halloween season, ranking activities as low, moderate or high risk.

For example, modifying trick-or-treating to let kids grab individually wrapped goodie bags while they stay at least six feet away from other people, was described as moderate risk. Traditional trick-or-treating was placed in the high-risk category.

Although the face-to-face interaction children have when they knock on doors is brief, the risk of transmitting a virus increases as more houses are visited, experts say. And if you’re trick-or-treating with large groups of children, the risk of transmission is even higher.

“If you’re doing something that

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Candidate responses for the 13th Senatorial District: Here’s what they had to say, in their own words | PA Power and Policy: Pennsylvania State News

To read this story in Spanish, click here. 

LNP | LancasterOnline asked each candidate in Lancaster County a set of questions and asked them to respond. We are publishing their responses, in their own words, with editing only for newspaper style and spelling.

The District: Of all the legislative races in Lancaster County, this is the most competitive. This district, which covers suburban, rural and urban areas, saw Democrats out-perform Republicans in raw voter registration numbers since 2016, when GOP Sen. Scott Martin won the seat. In 2018, former Democratic congressional candidate Jess King received 88 more votes than U.S. Rep. Lloyd Smucker within the 13th Senatorial District. These trends prompted the Pennsylvania Senate Democratic Campaign Committee to target the 13th this year as they seek to regain a Senate majority. But Republicans still outnumber Democrats inside the district’s borders by more than 13,000 registered voters.

Represents: Lancaster city; Bart,

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Here’s what it’s been like since the shot

On the afternoon of Sept. 22, I became a data point in the search for a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

That’s when I received the first of two shots in a clinical trial to develop a vaccine and became one of 30,000 volunteers to take a needlestick for science.

Why am I doing it? A combination of altruism, curiosity, and a sense of duty as a journalist. But more on that later.

Aside from the nurse who injected me and the hospital pharmacy that supplied her with the injection, no one else knows whether I received a placebo or the would-be vaccine. Not me. Not even Dr. Bindu Balani, the principal investigator in the trial at Hackensack University Medical Center, one of 89 study sites around the country.

This is called a double-blind study because both the researchers and the participants are blind to what was inside that syringe.

I

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Here’s what people are still wondering as they vote on the N.J. marijuana ballot question

EDITOR’S NOTE: NJ Cannabis Insider produces exclusive weekly content and monthly events geared toward those interested in the marijuana and hemp industries. To subscribe, visit njcannabisinsider.biz.

New Jersey voters will decide on Nov. 3 if the state will legalize recreational marijuana for those 21 and older, but many voters still have questions as to how officials will regulate and control a new industry.

NJ Advance Media previously published an article with frequently asked questions about the referenda and on Tuesday hosted a live town hall on NJ.com’s Facebook page with industry experts to address other concerns.

Here are the lingering questions and concerns viewers submitted.

Q: What steps will be taken to keep marijuana, especially edibles, away from children?

A: States that have legalized weed already have acted to prevent edibles from enticing children. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported in 2016 that the number of children

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I volunteered for a COVID-19 vaccine trial in New Jersey. Here’s what it’s been like since the shot.

On the afternoon of Sept. 22, I became a data point in the search for a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

That’s when I received the first of two shots in a clinical trial to develop a vaccine, and became one of 30,000 volunteers to take a needlestick for science.

Why am I doing it? A combination of altruism, curiosity, and a sense of duty as a journalist. But more on that later.

Aside from the nurse who injected me and the hospital pharmacy that supplied her with the injection, no one else knows whether I received a placebo or the would-be vaccine. Not me. Not even Dr. Bindu Balani, the principal investigator in the trial at Hackensack University Medical Center, one of 89 study sites around the country.

This is called a double-blind study because both the researchers and the participants are blind to what was inside that syringe.

I

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Just realized you’re out of pet food? Here’s how to have it delivered today

Yahoo Life is committed to finding you the best products at the best prices. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

Ruh-roh, we're out of kibble. (Photo: Getty Images)
Ruh-roh, we’re out of kibble. (Photo: Getty Images)

Just like you, your pet relies on a good diet to stay healthy and fit. The choices you make when it comes to pet food really do matter.

“Dogs and cats need to meet mineral and vitamin requirements, as well as energetic needs,” Dr. Joseph Wakshlag, a professor in the department of clinical sciences at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, tells Yahoo Life. “What they they eat is important to maintaining health.”

The right diet “plays a significant role in the management of a variety of diseases,” Dr. Valerie Parker, associate professor of small animal internal medicine and nutrition at The Ohio State University College of

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