Heres

Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

Read More

Teen influencer Danielle Cohn spoke openly about her abortion after becoming embroiled in controversy. Here’s how the social media star rose to prominence online.

Danielle Cohn
Danielle Cohn

Danielle Cohn

Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images

  • Influencer and musician Danielle Cohn, who boasts 18.2 million TikTok followers and 1.8 million YouTube subscribers, has become an online sensation thanks to her lip-syncing videos and controversial social media presence.

  • Since the social media star rose to prominence in 2016, fans and critics have speculated about her age and expressed concern about her sexualized social media presence.

  • Cohn made headlines in July when she made a video addressing a leaked audio clip that revealed that she had an abortion earlier this year.

  • Since posting the video, Cohn has received support from fans who “respected” her decision and transparency, but others remained concerned about her age and relationships.

  • Cohn’s mother, Jennifer Archambault, has described the situation as “painful,” and she hopes her daughter can heal out of the spotlight.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Video: Social media influencers adapt to pandemic

Read More

Here’s What the Science Actually Says About Kids and COVID-19

Benjamin Knorr, a 40-year-old single father in Janesville, Wisc., says there’s about a 50-50 chance he’ll send his two teenage sons back to school this fall. His 13-year-old, Aiden, would especially like to get back to his friends, sports, and regular life. But Knorr, an independent contractor, has asthma, and fears that his health and finances would be imperiled if one of his boys brought COVID-19 home from school.

“If the numbers go up in Dane County and Rock County, where I work and live, it’s over. We’re just doing the online school,” Knorr says. “We already got through two months of it, and yeah, it was hard. It was stressful. And yeah, it was more work on my part to come home and do the online schooling with them and stuff. But we can’t be homeless.”

As school districts across the United States decide whether to welcome kids back

Read More

Here’s How to Make Schools Safer for Reopening in the Fall

(Bloomberg Opinion) — During the weekend, the New York Times highlighted some of the comments it has received in reaction to articles about reopening schools. They were not a cause for optimism.

“Despite all my love for my students, I don’t really want to die for them or anyone else. Neither does my partner, who is living with cancer,” a teacher from Minneapolis wrote.

“Of course we need to reopen schools,” said a teacher from Maine, who then asked whether school nurses would be responsible for all the coronavirus testing that would be needed and where the schools would get enough personal protective equipment. “How many teachers receive combat pay while being forced into mortal heroics?” he added.

A parent from Massachusetts: “Does my daughter want to go back to the classroom? Yes. Do I prefer that she does? Yes. Do I want to risk her health in order for

Read More

Homeschool pods are gaining traction amid worries about school reopening; here’s how parents are getting the finances to work

Katrina Mulligan says her decision to organize a homeschooling “pod” – a modern version of a one-room schoolhouse, with a small group of parents splitting the cost of hiring teachers – wasn’t done lightly.

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the nation, she’s grown increasingly wary about her public school’s plan for getting kids back in the building.

“I don’t think it’s a great idea to send your kids to school in the middle of the pandemic,” says Mulligan, 40. “A lot of us started freaking out.”

At the same time, she adds, she and her husband found it difficult this spring to juggle working from home while managing their 6-year-old daughter’s virtual schooling. That experience, plus concerns about school safety, prompted her family to connect with four other families in their hometown of Alexandria, Virginia, to create a homeschooling “pod.” Mulligan plans on hiring a teacher to

Read More

Here’s a Complete Timeline of “The Kissing Booth” Stars Joey King and Jacob Elordi’s Relationship

From Seventeen

Netflix’s movie The Kissing Booth tells the super sweet and funny story of how Elle Evans (Joey King) and Noah Flynn (Jacob Elordi) start secretly dating, which becomes a major issue when Elle’s BFF and Noah’s younger brother, Lee Flynn (Joel Courtney) finds out.

Without giving too much away, Elle and Lee made a list of rules when they were younger, and one of them (number nine to be exact) states that Noah is totally off limits.

If you haven’t watched the movie yet, get on that because you’re bound to fall in love with this love story, especially once you find out the characters were a couple in real life.

Yep, you read that right. Joey King and Jacob Elordi dated for some time, but the called it quits before the second movie was released.

Here are the biggest moments of their relationship so far…

July 24,

Read More

These California moms were never going to send their kids to school in a pandemic. Here’s why

Sacramento mom Erin Gottis knew she wasn’t going to send her 9-year-old son Mason back into the classroom this fall well before his school district announced plans to start the academic year with distance learning.

Mason has severe asthma and Type 1 diabetes. Keeping him healthy and out of the hospital for something as simple as getting a cold during a normal school year was hard enough, Gottis, 39, said. Physically sending him back to school amid COVID-19 could kill him.

“There’s just no way he’s going to school unless they can give a 100% guarantee he won’t contract the coronavirus,” Gottis said. “Which is impossible at this point.”

Many California families like hers are bracing for months if not years of educating their medically fragile kids at home. They won’t send their kids to class until there’s a widely available vaccine or treatment for COVID-19.

Mason is one of

Read More

More Parents Are Considering Microschools Amid COVID-19: Here’s What They Entail

With conversations raging on about whether or not it’s safe to go back to school come fall, some parents are taking matters into their own hands. Across the US, the concept of “pandemic pods” are picking up steam as an alternative to both full-on virtual learning and sending children back to class amid COVID-19. Otherwise known as microschools, each “pod” is composed of roughly between three-to-six children of ideally similar ages and abilities who will gather at one family’s home to learn from a teacher. Using this system, each parent will chip in to cover the educator’s fees.

While the concept may seem like something reserved for elitist parents, given the safety concerns of traditional school, the lack of childcare available, and working parents’ hectic schedules, it’s being considered widely throughout the country. A private Facebook group called “Pandemic Pods” that was founded by families in San Fransisco, CA, already

Read More

If you absolutely have to visit the DMV, here’s what to expect

People without appointments wait in line for the Hollywood DMV field office to open on July 16. <span class="copyright">(Adam Tschorn / Los Angeles Times)</span>
People without appointments wait in line for the Hollywood DMV field office to open on July 16. (Adam Tschorn / Los Angeles Times)

For most people who have been through the experience, darkening the doorstep of a bricks-and-mortar California DMV field office is not unlike a trip to the dentist — something to be done only when absolutely necessary and only after all other options have been exhausted. That desire for avoidance is stronger right now, with the Golden State recently setting a new one-day record for coronavirus cases.

Actually visiting the DMV wasn’t an option for a while. In late March, all field offices statewide shuttered in response to COVID-19 concerns. It wasn’t until six weeks later that 25 offices opened back up to appointment-holding customers, and it wasn’t until June 11 that the rest of the field offices were back open for transactions that needed to be completed

Read More

Symptoms of COVID-19? Here’s what you can do right now

Yahoo Life is committed to finding you the best services to help improve your life. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Pricing and availability is subject to change.

Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)
Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)

Developing symptoms of COVID-19 is understandably terrifying. And, if you don’t have a primary care physician or you’re nervous to go to your doctor’s office or local hospital, it’s hard to know what to do.

That’s where telehealth comes in. Many doctor’s offices have shifted to providing healthcare through video chat or over the phone during the pandemic. For patients who don’t already have a provider, services like Amwell, one of the top telehealth platforms in the country, allow for quick and easy access to a doctor without a long wait time, and it’s relatively inexpensive for those who do

Read More