‘Do not book overseas holidays’, pleads Sturgeon

The Isle of Skye, in the Hebrides, could be one of Scots’ few overseas travel options this half term - Getty
The Isle of Skye, in the Hebrides, could be one of Scots’ few overseas travel options this half term – Getty

Nicola Sturgeon has told Scottish families not to book overseas holidays for October half term, as the nationwide shutdown begins. 

“Please think of the October break as an opportunity to further limit social interaction,” she urged in Tuesday afternoon’s Scottish Parliament address.

“And, given that this is a global pandemic, please do not book travel overseas for the October break if it is not essential.”

Though Scotland’s borders remain open, and the First Minister’s comments are not enshrined in law, tourism businesses have warned the remarks are a “nail in the coffin” for the “entire” travel sector. 

Mike Tibbert, vice president of the Scottish Passenger Agents Association, issued a damning statement in response to Sturgeon’s plea: “We seem to have government announcements actively designed to destroy travel jobs and

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J&J has started its late-stage coronavirus vaccine trial

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Hello,

Today in healthcare news: GoodRx is making its stock-market debut after pricing shares at $33 apiece just after midnight. At that price, the company is valued at $12.7 billion. What a time to be in the digital health/online prescription drug coupon business. 

Also: Johnson & Johnson has started a 60,000-person coronavirus vaccine trial, coronavirus deaths passed 200,000, and your ultimate guide to reading through vaccine data. 

Speaking of vaccines (and when are we not!):  Our biotech reporter Andrew Dunn is moderating a conversation on October 5 at 2 p.m. ET on the coronavirus vaccine race with 3 top experts:

  • Maria Elena Bottazzi, co-director of Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development

  • Art Caplan, bioethicist and

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Violence mounts against Iraqi doctors as COVID cases spike

By Amina Ismail

NAJAF, Iraq (Reuters) – Iraqi doctor Tariq Al-Sheibani remembers little else beyond cowering on the ground as a dozen relatives of a patient, who had just died of COVID-19, beat him unconscious.

About two hours later the 47-year-old director of Al-Amal Hospital in the southern city of Najaf woke up in a different clinic with bruises all over his body.

“All the doctors are scared,” said Sheibani, speaking at his home in Kufa a few weeks after the Aug. 28 attack. “Every time a patient dies, we all hold our breath.”

He is one of many doctors struggling to do their job as COVID-19 cases rise sharply in Iraq.

They are working within a health service that has been left to decay through years of civil conflict and underfunding, and now face the added threat of physical attack by grieving and desperate families.

Reuters spoke to seven

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Prestigious British university rocked by online allegations of sexual misconduct

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — One of Britain’s most prestigious universities, which has educated a future king, has been rocked by dozens of anonymous online allegations of rape and sexual misconduct.

The University of St. Andrews has been confronted with more than 100 posts on an Instagram account alleging incidents including sexual assault, harassment, rape as well as physical and emotional abuse. Most, but not all, of the testimonies appear to be connected to life at the Scottish university, but some of the posts suggest the incidents may have happened elsewhere.

The university said Tuesday that it had received one “actionable” report of alleged sexual misconduct since the St. Andrews Survivors account was set up in July, but a spokesperson said they could not comment on any individual case.

A general view of St Andrews University. (Matthew Lewis / Getty Images file)
A general view of St Andrews University. (Matthew Lewis / Getty Images file)

The #MeToo movement has inspired similar social media accounts

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Nick Cordero’s widow, Amanda Kloots, on his death from COVID-19

Nick Cordero’s widow, Amanda Kloots, believes her husband’s situation might have had a different outcome if he were to get sick today. She feels the hospital where he was admitted in March, after he fell ill, treated him well, but she notes that health professionals and scientists know so much more about COVID-19 today than they did six months ago.

“It was a different time, and Nick just got trapped,” Kloots told the New York Times in an interview published online late Tuesday. “I think it would be different if he went to the hospital now.”

The 41-year-old Broadway actor died on July 5, after having faced multiple complications in his struggle with COVID-19. He was placed in a medically induced coma, from which he eventually awakened. He also had is leg amputated because of a blood clotting issue.

Kloots was asked whether she thought Cordero’s situation might have turned

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Some wary parents won’t vaccinate kids, setting up future school showdowns

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

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Banks Halt U.K. Office Return; India Deaths Climb: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — HSBC Holdings Plc and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. paused plans to return workers to their London offices after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced new restrictions and urged residents to work from home where possible.

The U.S. death toll from the novel coronavirus exceeded 200,000, a grim milestone that comes eight months after the pathogen was first confirmed on American soil. India’s fatalities topped 90,000.

France’s new infections jumped above 10,000 after a weekend lull, while South Korea’s daily cases climbed above 100 for the first time in four days.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 31.6 million; deaths exceed 970,000CDC urges changes to holiday celebrations to curb virusMany of Covid’s biggest retail winners don’t even sell onlinePubs warn that Johnson’s Covid curfew will crush industryHow do people catch Covid-19? Here’s what experts say: QuickTake

Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here.

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The lives changed by lockdown, six months on

A family look on as Boris Johnson makes his televised lockdown address on 23 March (AFP/Getty)
A family look on as Boris Johnson makes his televised lockdown address on 23 March (AFP/Getty)

The past six months have whirled by like a fever dream – a whole series of surreal and nightmarish events which have somehow happened in no time at all.

It was exactly 26 weird weeks ago – on 23 March 2020 – that Boris Johnson announced that the nation was in lockdown, ushering in the most draconian restrictions on ordinary life since the Second World War.  

“You must stay home,” said the prime minister. “You should not be meeting with friends. You should not be meeting family. You should not be going shopping except for essentials like food and medicine – and you should do this as little as you can.”

Many of us told ourselves, and each other, that the worst would be over in a month or two. The economy would get

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Many parents are hesitant to give their kids a Covid-19 vaccine. What if schools require it?

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

Read More

Nick Cordero’s widow Amanda Kloots on his death from COVID-19

Nick Cordero’s widow, Amanda Kloots, believes her husband’s situation might have had a different outcome if he were to get sick today. She feels the hospital where he was admitted in March, after he fell ill, treated him well, but she notes that health professionals and scientists know so much more about COVID-19 today than they did six months ago.

“It was a different time, and Nick just got trapped,” Kloots told the New York Times in an interview published online late Tuesday. “I think it would be different if he went to the hospital now.”

The 41-year-old Broadway actor died July 5, after having faced multiple complications in his struggle with COVID-19. He was placed in a medically induced coma, from which he eventually awakened. He also had is leg amputated because of a blood clotting issue.

Kloots was asked whether she thought Cordero’s situation might have turned out

Read More