Medicine

Government tells firms to stockpile medicines for end of Brexit transition

There are concerns that the coronavirus crisis has led to a dwindling of medical stocks - EPA
There are concerns that the coronavirus crisis has led to a dwindling of medical stocks – EPA

Pharmaceutical companies should stockpile six weeks’ worth of drugs to limit disruption at the end of the Brexit transition period, the Government has warned.

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has written to medicine suppliers advising them to make boosting their reserves a priority.

The letter, published online on Monday, reiterates that ministers will not be asking for an extension to the transition period past December 31, despite the coronavirus pandemic.

There are concerns that the Covid-19 crisis has led to a dwindling of some medical stocks and that a disorderly exit without a trade deal could cause significant disruption.

Suppliers were advised all scenarios must be planned for, including reduced traffic flow at short crossings such as between Calais and Dunkirk, and Dover and Folkestone.

“We recognise that global supply

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What to know about sending your kids to college during the pandemic

How to go back to college safely during the pandemic
How to go back to college safely during the pandemic

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

With the end of summer drawing near, college students and their parents are preparing for a new semester. But for most, going back to school this year will likely look a lot different amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Some colleges and universities are reopening as fully virtual this fall, while others will offer a mix of both online and in-person classes. Those that are choosing to invite students back to campus are doing so with strict sanitation procedures in place along with new changes, like reduced class sizes, solo dorm rooms, and limited dining options. Some are even closing campus after fall break to reduce any risk from out-of-state students who are traveling.

Hannah Grice, a junior at Stevenson University in

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Businesses pivot to meet the demand for COVID-19 disinfection

MILWAUKEE – As more people are allowed back into offices, restaurants and hotels under the City of Milwaukee’s re-opening plans, the need for disinfection is greater than ever.

Pest 2 Rest Pest Control, a family-owned extermination company, is one of the many businesses that now specialize in COVID-19 disinfection.

“There is a 0.1% difference between sanitizing and disinfecting,” said Jeffery Hardy Sr., the co-owner of Pest 2 Rest. “So, sanitizing, you’re cleaning; disinfecting, you’re killing the virus. And that’s what we’re encouraging people to do.”

He also encourages clients to have a plan of action after his job is done.

Hardy’s business, as its name would suggest, started out killing bed bugs, roaches, rodents and other critters. Since March, Hardy chose to pivot like many other entrepreneurs. Now, he and his wife, Brenda, and sometimes their three kids as well, spray interiors to rid keyboards, desks and doorknobs of the

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How Planet Fitness, Ulta Beauty, And Kohl’s Changed Their Business Models To Successfully Whether The Storm Of The Coronavirus and Surge Forward Towards Profitability.

“If you want to succeed in retail, you need to fully commit to off-price or online,” -Jim Cramer, Mad Money, March 5, 2020

Retailers have been struggling for sometime to compete with the giant Big-box stores such as Amazon (AMZN), Walmart (WMT), Home Depot (HD), and Costco (COST), who offer massive discounts, great selection, and an easy shopping experience. Then the Coronavirus pandemic engulfed America this past March, and most retailers, other than essential ones like pharmacies and grocery stores, were forced to close their doors because consumers were self quarantined. After that took place, retailers needed to make changes to their stores to allow for proper social distancing and hygiene so they could open them safely. Brand loyalty gave way to buying whatever was cheapest. Some retailers, including JC Penney, Neiman Marcus and Brooks Brothers have already succumbed to the virus and have filed for bankruptcy. Others have laid

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High-Paying Jobs You Didn’t Know Existed

Everyone knows what a doctor or chiropractor does, but have you ever heard of an ayurveda healer or a hippotherapist? If you’re scratching your head, there’s a reason. They aren’t common, but these jobs are real and can pay quite well.

Last updated: Aug. 15, 2019

Feng Shui Consultant

Estimated pay: $20,000 to $250,000

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese practice that combines philosophy, science and art. If you have a strong energy and want to help others find balance, consider this career.

Feng shui consultants visit clients’ homes and offices to bring harmony and organization to the spaces by identifying ways to arrange belongings according to feng shui traditions.

Many online certification programs provide a path to this career. Those who charge a higher hourly rate and work with wealthy clients and celebrities have the highest earning potential — in the six figures.

Read: 20 Jobs That Pay

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Your Grocery Store Shopping Strategy During the Coronavirus Crisis

Almost every state now has an order for its residents to stay at home to help curb the spread of the coronavirus. One of the only reasons Americans can leave the house during this time is to stock up on essentials at the grocery store — but the thought of shopping for groceries can be anxiety-inducing.

GOBankingRates spoke to health experts about the best ways to minimize risks while stocking up on what you need at the grocery store.

Last updated: July 31, 2020

Opt For Delivery If You Can

If it’s possible for you to buy groceries online via Instacart, Amazon Fresh or another delivery service, that’s probably your safest bet.

“Grocery shopping could be challenging in times of viral outbreak as it exposes people to potential pathogens on surfaces and other shoppers that may be carriers,” said Tatiana Larionova, MS, LDN, CNS, a medical advisor for eMediHealth. “Online

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Screen schoolchildren using 90 minute test to keep them safe says Sir John

Screen schoolchildren using 90 minute test to keep them safe says Sir John
Screen schoolchildren using 90 minute test to keep them safe says Sir John

Two tests which can detect coronavirus and flu – and promise results in 90 minutes – are to be rolled out in hospitals, care homes and laboratories.

The swab and DNA tests will help deal with the virus in winter, enabling clinicians and NHS Test and Trace to differentiate between Covid-19, which requires sufferers to undergo specific self-isolation, and other seasonal illnesses, the Department of Health said.

But Sir John, Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford University, who is leading the government’s ongoing search for a reliable antibody test, has said that the new quick turnaround tests should be used at schools. ​

The leading immunologist told BBC Radio 4’s The Today Programme that tests need to be used “more extensively by the private sector” as he said there was a “huge unmet need by schools, by

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Melbourne curfew takes effect as disaster declared in state of Victoria

Australia’s state of Victoria has declared a disaster and imposed some of its harshest restrictions to date on movement as it seeks to combat a surge in coronavirus cases.

A further 671 infections and seven coronavirus deaths were announced in Victoria as the new measures, which officials said will remain in place for six weeks, took effect.

High numbers of community transmissions and cases of unknown origins have forced the new restrictions, which include limits on movement and citywide night time curfews. Officials have said that the measures will be in place for six weeks.

Melbourne, the second-largest city in Australia, is already under a reimposed six-week ‘stay at home’ order but has struggled to control the virus, with record numbers of infections recorded last week.

“The current rules have avoided thousands and thousands of cases each day, and then thousands of people in hospital and many more tragedies than

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How scientists revived an old-school treatment for a 21st century pandemic

Dr. Arturo Casadevall, a microbiologist and physician at Johns Hopkins University, has spearheaded a nationwide initiative to test the healing powers of "convalescent plasma" from COVID-19 survivors. <span class="copyright">(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Dr. Arturo Casadevall, a microbiologist and physician at Johns Hopkins University, has spearheaded a nationwide initiative to test the healing powers of “convalescent plasma” from COVID-19 survivors. (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

A few weeks after the new coronavirus arrived on U.S. shores, Dr. Arturo Casadevall hatched a plan to beat back the outbreak with a medical advance so powerful it had earned a Nobel Prize.

In 1901.

That’s when Dr. Emil Adolf von Behring was honored for pioneering the use of so-called convalescent serum as a treatment for diphtheria. In 1892, the Prussian bacteriologist infected horses with the pathogen that causes the deadly disease. If the beasts recovered, Von Behring harvested their blood, removed its red blood cells and clotting proteins, and introduced the resulting antibody-rich fluid into the bloodstreams of human diphtheria patients.

Until a diphtheria vaccine came into broad use in the 1930s, Von Behring’s daring

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More of you are helping us reimagine California after the pandemic. Keep the suggestions coming

Southbound lanes of the 110 Freeway heading into downtown Los Angeles are empty in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. <span class="copyright">(Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press)</span>
Southbound lanes of the 110 Freeway heading into downtown Los Angeles are empty in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press)

Last week, we published an update of the Opinion section’s “Reimagine California” project — in which we are asking readers to help guide our thinking on what California ought to look like after the COVID-19 pandemic — noting that more than 3,700 of you have sent us responses. We asked for more readers participation in the project; a few dozen of you obliged.

Your suggestions include, on one end, the granular, ground-level changes readers want to see — everything from increasing controlled burns in wilfire-prone areas to using germ-resistant grocery bags — and on the other, reforming entire segments of society such as healthcare and education. Sprinkled among those were calls for racial justice and, yes, partisan digs.

Similar to the 3,700 responses

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