Hospital

‘Gone to Be with the Lord’

Herman Cain Dies a Month After Contracting COVID-19: ‘We’re Heartbroken’

“We’re heartbroken, and the world is poorer: Herman Cain has gone to be with the Lord,” reads an update posted to his official website.

Herman Cain, the TV and radio host, former business executive and 2012 Republican presidential candidate, has died about a month after he became sick with the novel coronavirus disease, his team announced on Thursday morning. He was 74.

“We’re heartbroken, and the world is poorer: Herman Cain has gone to be with the Lord,” reads an update posted to his official website.

“We knew when he was first hospitalized with COVID-19 that this was going to be a rough fight,” Cain’s friend Dan Calabrese wrote in that update on Thursday. “He had trouble breathing and was taken to the hospital by ambulance. We all prayed that the initial meds they gave him would get his breathing

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As ‘covid couples’ reach five months of togetherness, Connecticut jewelers see jump in engagement ring sales

If sales of engagement rings are any indication, a growing number of couples hunkered down in quarantine during the coronavirus pandemic are asking themselves: why not?

In Connecticut, jewelers say they’ve seen a noticeable spike in demand for engagement rings from mid-March to July compared with previous years.

For the first two months of quarantine — if things were going well — couples browsed online. In May, as jewelry and other retail stores opened under Gov. Lamont’s Phase 1 guidelines, future brides and grooms scouted in person.

At Lux, Bond & Green’s six retail locations in Connecticut and Massachusetts, co-owner John Green estimates his engagement ring business is up 25% from the same period last year.

“When we shut down in March, we got emails and an appointment requests,” John Green, co-owner of Lux, Bond & Green, said. “We made special appointments and lots of social distancing and masks and

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Ice-T Says His Father-in-Law’s Lungs Are ‘Damaged Indefinitely’ After Contracting COVID-19

Ice T’s father-in-law is on the mend after contracting the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

The rapper and Law & Order: SVU actor made a virtual appearance on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon on Wednesday, where he gave an update on his wife Coco Austin’s father’s health condition.

“Coco’s dad is a Harley Davidson-riding, no-masking type of dude,” he said. “[Coronavirus] put him on his back.”

Last month, Ice-T revealed that Austin’s father Steve had been hospitalized in Arizona due to the coronavirus. He said his father-in-law had pneumonia in both lungs, and was almost put on a ventilator.

“It took him a month to make it out of the hospital,” he told Jimmy Fallon. “Now he’s home, but his lungs are damaged indefinitely.”

While the family is thankful that Steve’s health is improving, Ice-T said he shared the news of his father-in-law’s condition on social media to help bring awareness

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Inside Los Angeles’ Terrifying ‘Fast Fashion’ Coronavirus Hot Zone

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty

Carlos had been out of work for nearly a month in April when his roommate in Los Angeles, a fellow garment worker from Mexico, contracted COVID-19.

Carlos, who declined to provide his last name or the name of his employer for fear of retaliation, had to argue his friend of 10 years—who claimed he had the flu—into the hospital. Then he sanitized the one-bedroom unit they share with a bakery laborer in the neighborhood of Pico-Union, and managed to avoid catching the novel coronavirus himself. While his roommate recovered, Carlos recalled struggling to find the money for food and for rent, and subsisting on assistance from the nonprofit Garment Workers Center, an organizing and advocacy group. 

When the shop where he had worked the past two years reopened in early June, Carlos said he was reluctant to return at first for fear of

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How to Be a More Eco-Friendly Pet Owner

Westend61 / Getty Images

Our pets can be hard on the environment. “They can have a big impact, especially when you consider that there are about 175 million dogs and cats in the U.S.,” says Katherine Miller, an animal behaviorist for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Here are a few ways to help your pet be kinder to the planet.

Related: Four Things to Do Before You Adopt a Pet

Adopt a pet.

Take in a pet from a shelter and you’ll save it from being one of the more than three million cats and dogs euthanized each year. You’ll also do your part to help reduce the resources used in shelters. If you long for a particular type of dog or cat, check out Petfinder online or breed-rescue organizations.

Keep the numbers down.

When you spay or neuter your pet, you may conserve future

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Medicare coverage for Alzheimer brain scans in question

A big study to help Medicare officials decide whether to start covering brain scans to check for Alzheimer’s disease missed its goals for curbing health care costs, calling into question whether the pricey tests are worth it.

The results announced Thursday are from a $100 million study of more than 25,000 Medicare recipients. It’s been closely watched by private insurers too, as the elderly population grows and more develop this most common form of dementia, which currently has no cure.

Advocates for coverage say they hope to persuade the agency that the scans still offer benefits even if they don’t save much or any money. An accurate diagnosis helps families plan for the future even if the course of the disease can’t be changed, said Dr. Gil Rabinovici of the University of California, San Francisco.

He led the study and gave results at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference taking place

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Herman Cain Dies Weeks After Contracting COVID-19: ‘We’re Heartbroken’

Paul Drinkwater/AP Herman Cain in 2011

Herman Cain, the TV and radio host, former business executive and 2012 Republican presidential candidate, has died about a month after he became sick with the novel coronavirus disease, his team announced on Thursday morning. He was 74.

“We’re heartbroken, and the world is poorer: Herman Cain has gone to be with the Lord,” reads an update posted to his official website.

“We knew when he was first hospitalized with COVID-19 that this was going to be a rough fight,” Cain’s friend Dan Calabrese wrote in that update on Thursday. “He had trouble breathing and was taken to the hospital by ambulance. We all prayed that the initial meds they gave him would get his breathing back to normal, but it became clear pretty quickly that he was in for a battle.”

Calabrese continued: “We all prayed so hard every day. We knew the

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An Extra $600 a Week Kept Many Jobless Workers Afloat. Now What Will They Do?

Rebecca Mallery, who is applying for subsidized housing for herself, and her 9-year-old son, Chord Pagel, outside her home in Bullhead City, Ariz. on July 28, 2020. (Joe Buglewicz/The New York Times)
Rebecca Mallery, who is applying for subsidized housing for herself, and her 9-year-old son, Chord Pagel, outside her home in Bullhead City, Ariz. on July 28, 2020. (Joe Buglewicz/The New York Times)

For Sara Gard, the government’s safety net moved smoothly into place when the coronavirus pandemic upended her family’s lives. Jobless benefit checks began arriving a few days after she was furloughed in April from an entertainment company in Atlanta. A $600 weekly supplement, part of an emergency federal program, would cover the mortgage until her company resumed operations — probably in June.

June came and went, and the reopening was pushed to August. Now August is near, the business is still shuttered, and the weekly benefit booster has run out.

“When the $600 is gone, we’re going to totally have to rethink our lives because we don’t have a way to pay the mortgage,” Gard said. Without it,

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Inside L.A.’s Raging ‘Fast Fashion’ Coronavirus Hot Zone

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty

Carlos had been out of work for nearly a month in April when his roommate in Los Angeles, a fellow garment worker from Mexico, contracted COVID-19.

Carlos, who declined to provide his last name or the name of his employer for fear of retaliation, had to argue his friend of 10 years—who claimed he had the flu—into the hospital. Then he sanitized the one-bedroom unit they share with a bakery laborer in the neighborhood of Pico-Union, and managed to avoid catching the novel coronavirus himself. While his roommate recovered, Carlos recalled struggling to find the money for food and for rent, and subsisting on assistance from the nonprofit Garment Workers Center, an organizing and advocacy group.

When the shop where he had worked the past two years reopened in early June, Carlos said he was reluctant to return at first for fear of

Read More

Inside LA’s Raging ‘Fast Fashion’ Coronavirus Hot Zone

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty

Carlos had been out of work for nearly a month in April when his roommate in Los Angeles, a fellow garment worker from Mexico, contracted COVID-19.

Carlos, who declined to provide his last name or the name of his employer for fear of retaliation, had to argue his friend of 10 years—who claimed he had the flu—into the hospital. Then he sanitized the one-bedroom unit they share with a bakery laborer in the neighborhood of Pico-Union, and managed to avoid catching the novel coronavirus himself. While his roommate recovered, Carlos recalled struggling to find the money for food and for rent, and subsisting on assistance from the nonprofit Garment Workers Center, an organizing and advocacy group. 

When the shop where he had worked the past two years reopened in early June, Carlos said he was reluctant to return at first for fear of

Read More