Health

Educators join National Day of Resistance

Educators gathered Monday in demonstrations across the country addressing twin concerns of a safe and equitable school environment amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the nationwide reckoning around racial justice after the killing of George Floyd.

The demonstrations, held in dozens of cities, including Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, were part of the National Day of Resistance, organized by a coalition of teachers unions, social justice organizations and the Democratic Socialists of America. They took place in a combination of socially distant rallies and car caravans.

Educators who planned to participate in the day of action spoke to NBC News’ Social Newsgathering team in advance of the rallies. Many explained that their major concerns centered around the disproportionately negative impact COVID’s new distance-learning modules had on students of color and low-income students, their concern about equitable access to online learning and, ultimately, concern about the lack of clarity in plans

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A psychologist explains why people shouldn’t feel guilty taking time off from work during the pandemic

While the boundaries between work and life are blurrier than ever, many are realizing that their busiest days are still disguised as “leisure time” because they’re working from the comfort of their homes. This new work-life balance, or lack thereof, is causing some employees to be hesitant to cash in on their hard-earned vacation days.

Yahoo Life Mental Health Contributor Jen Hartstein shares ways why taking time off is more vital than ever.

“We’re at this very weird time where work and life are blending all the time. And for many we feel like it’s not the right time to take time off,” she explains. “Maybe we aren’t going anywhere, we’re not traveling, so we kind of figure, ‘Why bother?’” 

However, it’s important for us to take time off because “the more space we create, the better and more rejuvenated we come back to the office and to work,” she

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U.S. Cases Increase 0.9%; California, Arizona Slow: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) —

California and Arizona reported positive trends on new cases after battling a surge in infections last month. New Jersey, concerned about recent violations of social-distancing rules among young revelers, reduced crowd limits for indoor parties.

Eli Lilly & Co. will begin testing its Covid-19 antibody drug in nursing homes, a treatment with potential to protect vulnerable groups that vaccines may not cover. Global coronavirus cases surpassed 18 million, with the pandemic now adding a million infections every four days.

Iran’s virus death toll may have been almost three times larger than official counts, the BBC reported, while Hong Kong said it had the fewest number of new cases since July 22.

Key Developments

Global Tracker: Global cases top 18 million; deaths pass 689,000Fauci says face shields good idea for teachers back in schoolsU.K. reviewing Covid-fighting options including London lockdownFacing fierce new waves, virus hunters turn to sewage and

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The U.S. Health Care System Is Designed To Fail When It’s Needed Most

The American health care system leaves us all vulnerable to massive costs and uneven access, even under the best of circumstances. But when the economy goes south, things get really awful.

The novel coronavirus pandemic and the United States’ feckless response to the outbreak has triggered a historic economic downturn that has cost tens of millions of jobs. Because almost half of the country ― about 160 million workers, spouses and dependents ― get their health coverage through an employer, those lost jobs almost always mean lost health insurance

Between February and May, an estimated 5.4 million people became uninsured because of job loss, according to the liberal advocacy organization Families USA. The group describes this as the largest loss of job-based health benefits in U.S. history, worse even than during the Great Recession in 2008 and 2009. 

And job losses have continued to mount since May, meaning

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Pac-12 player movement could lead to seismic change, despite unrealistic demands

Close your eyes for a minute and begin to ponder the drumbeat leading up to the 2021 college football season. The COVID-19 pandemic will – insert a word synonymous with a prayer emoji – be mercifully in the rear-view mirror. The normal rhythms of media days, full-contact fall camps and 12-game schedules lie ahead. The only relevant conversations about masks will involve 15-yard penalties.

That coveted slice of normalcy feels light years away, as college football remains shrouded in uncertainty by the coronavirus and beset by debilitating budget issues.

Here’s the reality we saw over a chaotic weekend. That normalcy we’ve longed for – when it finally arrives – is going to bring a jarring new normal with it. Whether this is a better place for college sports will be the upcoming decade’s bar debate.

Within a calendar year, college athletics will be operating in a seismically different way. There’s

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Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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Check Out Fall Plans For NoVA School Districts

VIRGINIA — With about a month to go before school resumes in the fall, many school districts across the United States continue to grapple with how best to offer instruction amid the coronavirus pandemic. In Northern Virginia, the debate has ended, with all school districts in the region choosing to start the 2020-2021 school year with virtual instruction.

Many school districts considered a hybrid approach, where students could choose to spend two or three days a week at school and two days with remote instruction. Almost 43 percent of parents of children in the Fairfax County Public Schools system picked the hybrid option compared to nearly 41 percent who opted for 100-percent online learning. In Loudoun County, a majority of parents in Loudoun County selected the all-virtual option for their children.

As the coronavirus grew worse in southeastern Virginia and other parts of the country, school districts in Northern Virginia

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California passes 500,000 cases; 97% of residents on watchlist

California officially surpassed 500,000 total lab-confirmed coronavirus infections and set a new daily high for reported COVID-19 deaths over the weekend, while Sacramento County reached the 10,000-case mark.

The state reported 219 new deaths from the respiratory disease Saturday and another 132 Sunday to bring the pandemic’s official statewide death toll to 9,356, according to data from the California Department of Public Health.

Sacramento County health officials have confirmed 142 resident deaths from COVID-19, the disease caused by the highly contagious coronavirus, including 91 residing in the city of Sacramento.

The county suffered at least 49 COVID-19 deaths in July, making it the deadliest month of the health crisis so far. Sacramento County had 34 deaths from the virus in April, followed by 18 in each of May and June, according to public health officials’ data dashboard. The July count is likely to grow in the coming days because it

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Scientists Worry About Political Influence Over Coronavirus Vaccine Project

Dr. Stephen Hahn, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, speaks during a coronavirus task force news conference in Rockville, Md., June 30, 2020. (Samuel Corum/The New York Times)
Dr. Stephen Hahn, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, speaks during a coronavirus task force news conference in Rockville, Md., June 30, 2020. (Samuel Corum/The New York Times)

In April, with hospitals overwhelmed and much of the United States in lockdown, the Department of Health and Human Services produced a presentation for the White House arguing that rapid development of a coronavirus vaccine was the best hope to control the pandemic.

“DEADLINE: Enable broad access to the public by October 2020,” the first slide read, with the date in bold.

Given that it typically takes years to develop a vaccine, the timetable for the initiative, called Operation Warp Speed, was incredibly ambitious. With tens of thousands dying and tens of millions out of work, the crisis demanded an all-out public-private response, with the government supplying billions of dollars to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, providing logistical support

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The New College Drop-Off

Matthew and Audrey Lorence at their home in Needham, Mass., July 28, 2020. (Katherine Taylor/The New York Times)
Matthew and Audrey Lorence at their home in Needham, Mass., July 28, 2020. (Katherine Taylor/The New York Times)

Maureen Rayhill of Seattle sounds like a public health official as she describes the current process for coronavirus testing, rattling off research she’s done on in-person testing centers versus mail-order companies and how their turnaround times for results compare. But she’s not. She’s a mother, just trying to get her oldest child to college.

The poignant annual tradition of college drop-off — parents driving the new, nervous college student to school, bringing along brothers and sisters to see their sibling’s new home, setting up the tiny dorm room together, sharing one last meal with the entire family, then waving goodbye as the almost-adult runs off with a big pack of possible new best friends — has become the latest family milestone rendered almost unrecognizable by the coronavirus pandemic.

Rayhill, 49, has already

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