Day: September 12, 2020

Classes To Remain Online Through Spring 2021

CALIFORNIA — As COVID-19 continues to remain widespread in California, all 23 California State University campuses will default most of their classes to online instruction for the spring term, beginning January 2021. The university system will also enter another semester with a reduced population of students living on campus, CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White announced Thursday.

The CSU was the first university system in the country to announce that its classes would be held online to mitigate the spread in May.

“This decision is the only responsible one available to us at this time,” White said in a news release. “And it is the only one that supports our twin North Stars of safeguarding the health, safety and well-being of our faculty, staff, students and communities, as well as enabling degree progression for the largest number of students.”

The announcement comes after Chico State University became the first California college

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AstraZeneca resumes vaccine trial; Puerto Rico reopens beaches; US downgrades Mexico travel warning

Drug developers are racing to create a COVID-19 vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed. 

But a return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home. 

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students

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How Colleges Became the New COVID Hot Spots

The State University of New York, Oneonta campus in Oneonta, Sept. 3, 2020. (Cindy Schultz/The New York Times)
The State University of New York, Oneonta campus in Oneonta, Sept. 3, 2020. (Cindy Schultz/The New York Times)

It began last month with a trickle of coronavirus infections as college students arrived for the fall semester. Soon that trickle became a stream, with campuses reporting dozens, and sometimes hundreds, of new cases each day.

Now that stream feels like a flood. In just the past week, a New York Times survey has found, U.S. colleges and universities have recorded more than 36,000 additional coronavirus cases, bringing the total of campus infections to 88,000 since the pandemic began.

Not all of those cases are new, and the increase is partly the result of more schools beginning to report the results of increased coronavirus testing. But The Times survey of 1,600 institutions also shows how widely the contagion has spread, with schools of every type and size, and in every state, reporting

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UK on ‘edge of losing control’ of virus, says Sage adviser

Boris Johnson has been urged to abandon the Government's campaign to get people back to the office as cases in the UK surge - AFP
Boris Johnson has been urged to abandon the Government’s campaign to get people back to the office as cases in the UK surge – AFP

The UK is on “the edge of losing control” of the virus and people who can work from home should continue to do so, according to Sage adviser and former Government Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Mark Walport.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme this morning, he said: “I think one would have to say that we’re on the edge of losing control, and you’ve only got to look across the Channel to see what’s happening in France and what’s happening in Spain.

“The French on Thursday had 9,800 new infections and one can see that their hospital admissions and indeed intensive care admissions are going up.

“The figures in the UK on September 5, it was about 1,800 people identified with infection. On the

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Vaccine won’t immediately end pandemic, Fauci says; Puerto Rico reopens beaches; US downgrades Mexico travel warning

Drug developers are racing to create a vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed. 

A return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home. 

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students represent 19

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Red Light Therapy May Actually Be the Fountain of Youth

When I first encountered red light therapy (RLT), I thought I’d found the holy grail of health treatments. It sounds like actual magic: With the flick of a switch, a dose of red light is rumored to cure everything from acne to sore muscles from the cellular level up. No chemicals, no down time. But as with most magical-sounding health cure-alls, you have to wonder: Too good to be true?

There is a lot to be excited about, according to experts, but RLT isn’t totally free of controversy, either. Here’s how red light therapy works, and which of its claims are legit and which remain shady.

What is red light therapy?

RLT works its magic by delivering safe, concentrated wavelengths of natural light into your skin (around five millimeters, to be exact) where it’s absorbed by your cells. This “stimulates the production of collagen, elastin, and fibroblasts,” says Rhonda Klein,

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The ghosts in my phone

Despite my best efforts, I occasionally receive mail addressed to Carol, the woman from whose estate my wife and I purchased our house three years ago. Carol, who died in 2016 at the glorious age of 99, had lived here since the Roosevelt administration and died in the room in which I am writing this. Even if her son had not given me helpful advice concerning the pre-Depression boiler system, I would know a great deal about Carol, who was universally beloved in town. Some of her grandchildren live next door; she worshiped at the Episcopal church down the street for some 70 years. The neighbors all remember the backyard in the days before she had allowed it to become a half-acre forest, in which I discovered the ruins of a gazebo and some makeshift garden trellises (actually ancient copper pipes). Besides, I get her mail: solicitations from the Sierra

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During the COVID-19 pandemic, some are trying breathwork classes to relieve anxiety

When Hermosa Beach, Calif., entrepreneur Amy Lloyd took her first breathwork class, she never expected it to make her emotional. After all, the yoga and meditation classes she regularly attends leave her feeling refreshed and rarely stir up her innermost feelings. Yet after her first class, she says, “it was like years of therapy in one session.”

If you’ve ever practiced yoga, meditation or tai chi, breathwork was almost certainly a large part of the activity. But in recent years, breathwork classes that aren’t tied to any other practice have surged in popularity, in part because they don’t require skills or experience, just the ability to do something we all do every day without much thought: breathe.

“I call it free medicine because the breath is like the Swiss Army knife of the body; there are so many different ways to use it to create a positive effect for yourself,”

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US universities fight Covid surges

When Caroline Rose moved into her dorm at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, in August, there was none of the usual frantic flurry of meeting new resident assistants and greeting old friends in hallways.

Roommates were told to move in on separate days, and everyone was told to wear masks, including in shared bathrooms. Students were given designated move-in times so there wouldn’t be a rush of people.

Related: ‘I’m extremely nervous’: US grapples with in-person or virtual classes

Even before students got on to campus, they were instructed to sign a “stop the spread” agreement, acknowledging that they would follow guidelines to mitigate an outbreak of Covid-19, including staying in groups of no more than 10 students, or suffer consequences.

The consequences came soon enough. Less than a week after classes started the university, which has a student population of about 20,000, reported 500 coronavirus cases. In-person classes

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NHS chief and leading health experts question ‘enormous cost’ of Operation Moonshot

 (AFP via Getty Images)
(AFP via Getty Images)

The government should consider redirecting funds from the estimated £100bn bill for Operation Moonshot to other parts of the country’s coronavirus response, an NHS chief and other health experts have said.

Figures from NHS Providers and Independent Sage group have called into question the government’s new mass testing programme, which aims to increase the UK’s capacity to 10 million tests a day.

No 10 is hoping to roll out rapid-fire Covid-19 tests within the wider community that could provide a result in just 20 minutes, but critics have pointed out that the appropriate technology does not yet exist – something the government has openly acknowledged.

Concern has also been raised among statisticians and health officials that Moonshot could return thousands of false positives, forcing people into unnecessary self-isolation.

Leaked documents seen by the BMJ medical journal suggested the project could have a price tag of £100bn

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