Day: August 3, 2020

Educators join National Day of Resistance

Educators gathered Monday in demonstrations across the country addressing twin concerns of a safe and equitable school environment amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the nationwide reckoning around racial justice after the killing of George Floyd.

The demonstrations, held in dozens of cities, including Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, were part of the National Day of Resistance, organized by a coalition of teachers unions, social justice organizations and the Democratic Socialists of America. They took place in a combination of socially distant rallies and car caravans.

Educators who planned to participate in the day of action spoke to NBC News’ Social Newsgathering team in advance of the rallies. Many explained that their major concerns centered around the disproportionately negative impact COVID’s new distance-learning modules had on students of color and low-income students, their concern about equitable access to online learning and, ultimately, concern about the lack of clarity in plans

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A psychologist explains why people shouldn’t feel guilty taking time off from work during the pandemic

While the boundaries between work and life are blurrier than ever, many are realizing that their busiest days are still disguised as “leisure time” because they’re working from the comfort of their homes. This new work-life balance, or lack thereof, is causing some employees to be hesitant to cash in on their hard-earned vacation days.

Yahoo Life Mental Health Contributor Jen Hartstein shares ways why taking time off is more vital than ever.

“We’re at this very weird time where work and life are blending all the time. And for many we feel like it’s not the right time to take time off,” she explains. “Maybe we aren’t going anywhere, we’re not traveling, so we kind of figure, ‘Why bother?’” 

However, it’s important for us to take time off because “the more space we create, the better and more rejuvenated we come back to the office and to work,” she

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Kate Middleton Remembers Her Great-Grandmother and Grandmother’s Contributions as Red Cross Nurses

Joe Giddens – WPA Pool/Getty Kate Middleton

The royal family is celebrating the 150th anniversary of the British Red Cross.

Kate Middleton, Queen Elizabeth and other members of the family paid tribute to British Red Cross staff and volunteers on Monday as the charity marks its milestone year.

Kate personally thanked 150 outstanding staff and volunteers, who were nominated by the charity for their contributions to received a commemorative coin created specially by the Royal Mint for the anniversary. In her letter, the royal mom recalled her own family ties to the Red Cross, with both her great-grandmother Olive Middleton and grandmother Valerie Middleton having served as Red Cross nurses during World War I and World War II, respectively.

“Like you and many others, they are both part of the rich history of the British Red Cross, which is helping to ensure many people get the support they need during

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U.S. Cases Increase 0.9%; California, Arizona Slow: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) —

California and Arizona reported positive trends on new cases after battling a surge in infections last month. New Jersey, concerned about recent violations of social-distancing rules among young revelers, reduced crowd limits for indoor parties.

Eli Lilly & Co. will begin testing its Covid-19 antibody drug in nursing homes, a treatment with potential to protect vulnerable groups that vaccines may not cover. Global coronavirus cases surpassed 18 million, with the pandemic now adding a million infections every four days.

Iran’s virus death toll may have been almost three times larger than official counts, the BBC reported, while Hong Kong said it had the fewest number of new cases since July 22.

Key Developments

Global Tracker: Global cases top 18 million; deaths pass 689,000Fauci says face shields good idea for teachers back in schoolsU.K. reviewing Covid-fighting options including London lockdownFacing fierce new waves, virus hunters turn to sewage and

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The U.S. Health Care System Is Designed To Fail When It’s Needed Most

The American health care system leaves us all vulnerable to massive costs and uneven access, even under the best of circumstances. But when the economy goes south, things get really awful.

The novel coronavirus pandemic and the United States’ feckless response to the outbreak has triggered a historic economic downturn that has cost tens of millions of jobs. Because almost half of the country ― about 160 million workers, spouses and dependents ― get their health coverage through an employer, those lost jobs almost always mean lost health insurance

Between February and May, an estimated 5.4 million people became uninsured because of job loss, according to the liberal advocacy organization Families USA. The group describes this as the largest loss of job-based health benefits in U.S. history, worse even than during the Great Recession in 2008 and 2009. 

And job losses have continued to mount since May, meaning

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What to know about sending your kids to college during the pandemic

How to go back to college safely during the pandemic
How to go back to college safely during the pandemic

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With the end of summer drawing near, college students and their parents are preparing for a new semester. But for most, going back to school this year will likely look a lot different amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Some colleges and universities are reopening as fully virtual this fall, while others will offer a mix of both online and in-person classes. Those that are choosing to invite students back to campus are doing so with strict sanitation procedures in place along with new changes, like reduced class sizes, solo dorm rooms, and limited dining options. Some are even closing campus after fall break to reduce any risk from out-of-state students who are traveling.

Hannah Grice, a junior at Stevenson University in

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‘Hero’ father-of-seven died while rescuing his children who got into difficulty at sea

Jonathan Stevens died a hero saving children - UNPIXS (Europe)/Universal News And Sport (Scotland)
Jonathan Stevens died a hero saving children – UNPIXS (Europe)/Universal News And Sport (Scotland)

A “hero” father-of-seven died while rescuing his children who got into difficulty at sea.

Jonathan Stevens, 36, was reportedly caught in a rip tide as he tried to heave two of his children to safety during the incident in Barmouth, northwest Wales on Sunday afternoon.

Emergency services were called just before 2pm and the plasterer, from Telford in Shropshire, was retrieved from the water and taken to Ysbyty Gwynedd hospital by air ambulance, where he later passed away.

In a tribute, his partner Laura, who was at home when the incident happened, said: “Words can’t explain how we are all feeling, not only me and our kids but his other kids and his family.

“I owe this man everything bringing our babies back, just so sad that we have all lost him but I know he

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These Expert-Approved DIY Traps Will Actually Kill Ants in Your Home

Photo credit: Shayne Hill Xtreme Visuals - Getty Images
Photo credit: Shayne Hill Xtreme Visuals – Getty Images

From Prevention

It isn’t exactly ideal when you spot a line of ants traipsing through your place or hanging out on your kitchen counters. After all, you live there and, last you checked, you didn’t sign up for pests as roommates.

If you have kids or pets, though, it’s understandable that you might be wary of whipping out more conventional ant-killing methods, like pesticide-ladened sprays and bait traps.

So, what other methods can help kill them off? Below, pest experts explain why these tiny critters can be tough to eradicate, and the DIY ant traps that will actually get rid of them.

Why is it so hard to get rid of ants?

“Ants typically build large colonies, sometimes in hard to reach places,” explains board-certified entomologist Desiree Straubinger, market technical director for Western Exterminator. “It becomes a numbers game where even

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Pac-12 player movement could lead to seismic change, despite unrealistic demands

Close your eyes for a minute and begin to ponder the drumbeat leading up to the 2021 college football season. The COVID-19 pandemic will – insert a word synonymous with a prayer emoji – be mercifully in the rear-view mirror. The normal rhythms of media days, full-contact fall camps and 12-game schedules lie ahead. The only relevant conversations about masks will involve 15-yard penalties.

That coveted slice of normalcy feels light years away, as college football remains shrouded in uncertainty by the coronavirus and beset by debilitating budget issues.

Here’s the reality we saw over a chaotic weekend. That normalcy we’ve longed for – when it finally arrives – is going to bring a jarring new normal with it. Whether this is a better place for college sports will be the upcoming decade’s bar debate.

Within a calendar year, college athletics will be operating in a seismically different way. There’s

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Engineered decoys trap virus in test tube study; healthcare workers at high risk even with protections

By Nancy Lapid

(Reuters) – The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Open https://graphics.reuters.com/HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/yxmvjqywprz/index.html in an external browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines and treatments in development.

Engineered decoys trap virus before it can enter cells

The new coronavirus enters cells by attaching to a protein on the cell membrane called the ACE2 receptor. Scientists have now developed a decoy version of ACE2 that lures the virus and traps it, preventing it from infecting human lung cells in test tubes. “We have engineered our ACE2 Trap to bind 100 to 1,000 times tighter to the virus than normal ACE2 that is on victim cells. This provides even more potent blockage that is comparable to neutralizing antibodies,” Dr. James Wells of the University of California

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